IP

The PulPac patent portfolio currently holds more than a dozen patent families comprising some 40 patents, granted and pending, covering some 50 nations.

PulPac protects its innovative Dry Molding Fiber technology with an extensive and continously expanding patent portfolio as well as a significant body of know-how and trade secrets.

PulPac IP covers multiple areas of fiber application manufacturing and new IP is filed continuously
The IP revolves around the novel production method, “PulPac Method”, which means a method of manufacturing three dimensionally shaped cellulose articles formed from dry fibers formatted by air as a carrying medium and pressed using a heated mold. Based on the core IP, PulPac has developed a complete technology platform covering multiple areas of fiber application manufacturing. All driven by the need of disruptive technical solutions that enable a sustainable packaging industry. As world leader in R&D for Dry Molded Fiber, PulPac files new IP every month.

The PulPac Technology Pool – an innovative and committed community
PulPac has placed all its IP in a technology pool with the clear intention to reduce the global usage of single-use plastics.  Licensees and members in the technology pool get unique access to optimized processes for putting fully fiber based and renewable single-use products on the market. Members join an innovative community committed to actively contribute to the development and industrialization of sustainable Dry Molded Fiber products and to the Technology Pool. Essential improvements and core development of PulPac IP is available to all members, as is all current and future PulPac IP.  The mutual motivation to constantly push technology development forward is part of the package.

The origin of the Dry Molded Fiber innovation
The method of dry molding cellulose was invented by Linus and Ove Larsson. At the time they were both working in an independent packaging innovation consultancy within the WPP Group. They ran several large innovation projects for the packaging industry and realized the environmental madness of continuing to produce packaging and single-use products made of plastics. They also realized that commercially viable and sustainable alternatives did not exist. One could get either sustainability or commerciality. Not both combined. Fibers from trees, cellulose, stood out as the only sustainable alternative that could supply enough raw material to actually replace plastics at scale, without competing with land area to grow crops. Being aware of the drawbacks of traditional methods of molding cellulose, they experimented with dry molding. The breakthrough came as they placed cellulose from an ordinary baby diaper in a sheet metal press. Using a little heat, they managed to 3D-shape the diaper into a rock-hard product in seconds. Dry Molded Fiber was invented.